dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale

dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale

Dentures

Dentures, also known as false teeth, are prosthetic devices constructed to replace missing teeth, and which are supported by surrounding soft and hard tissues of the oral cavity. Conventional dentures are removable, however there are many different denture designs, some which rely on clasping onto teeth or dental implants.

While dentures take some getting used to, today's dentures are natural looking and more comfortable than ever.  A good denture should fit firmly and give good support.

How can Dentures help?
Categories of Denture
Different types of Denture
How are dentures made? 
Denture fit
Denture Adhesive
Taking care of your dentures
Every Year
Speaking tips
Eating tips

Dentures help:

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Function as chewing ability is improved

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Aesthetics because a denture supports the lips and cheeks and corrects the collapsed appearance that occurs after losing teeth, thus providing a more natural facial appearance

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Improve pronunciation

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Improve Self-Esteem

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Partial dentures – for patients who are missing some of their teeth on a particular arch.  These can be an alternative to a bridge.

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Full dentures – are worn by patients who are missing all of the teeth on a single arch.  A conventional full denture is fitted after any remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed.  Healing may take several months.

An immediate full denture is inserted immediately after any remaining teeth are removed.  While the immediate denture offers the benefit of never having to be without your teeth, they must be relined several months later; as the bone that supports the teeth reshapes as it heals causing the dentures to become loose.

Different types of Denture:

Acrylic – Support for plastic or acrylic dentures comes from the soft tissues (gums) only. The plastic components may surround natural teeth (in the case of partial dentures), but they do not acquire any significant support from them.  Acrylic partial dentures occasionally have metal clips or clasps, but this is to help retain the denture and keep it in place.

Cobalt Chromium - these metal partial dentures are made from an alloy of cobalt and chromium and they are much stronger than acrylic dentures. They are lighter to wear and can be supported by the remaining teeth. Although the base is metal, acrylic is then used to attach artificial teeth to the metal framework.

Natural teeth provide extra retention for a partial denture and more importantly distribute the loading and stresses of a partial denture through these natural teeth.

Cobalt chromium dentures can be designed in various ways to suit individual patients, for example a 'skeleton' design can be made so that it comes into minimal contact with the soft palate, reducing incidence of gagging. They can also be utilised to reinforce full dentures and be used to strengthen implant retained acrylic dentures.

How are dentures made?

Once you have discussed your denture options and decided to go ahead you will need to make a series of 4 appointments usually a week apart, however a cobalt chromium requires 2 weeks between the second and third visit:

1  

An initial impression

2  

A more accurate, working impression is taken using a special tray fitted to your mouth, and a wax bite is made to show the technician how your teeth meet and articulate.  This is also the time when you decide on the colour or can express any specific views regarding the size and shape of the teeth.

3  

This is a vital stage of the process; now is the time when you need to state any changes to the colour, shape and general appearance of the denture.  At this point the teeth are set in wax.

4  

Finally they are fitted.  Even for experienced denture wearers, new dentures can be a challenge.  Your mouth needs to adjust to the new dentures; you will likely experience increased salivation and possibly sore spots in your mouth. If soreness persists, return to your dentist. Expect a longer denture adjustment time if you recently had teeth extracted. Try to wear your dentures as much as possible.

Denture Adhesive

Even with well fitting dentures it is normal for your dentures to move a little when eating and talking.  You may find this feels strange and even makes your gums sore. A denture adhesive is not a substitute for a well fitting denture so always consult your dentist should your denture become looser over time.  Denture adhesives are designed to:

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Increase the hold of your dentures

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Reduce denture movement and cushion your gums making your dentures feel more comfortable

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Provide a seal along the edges of the denture which helps to prevent food getting trapped underneath

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Enable you to feel confident in social situations.

Taking care of your dentures

Taking good care of your dentures helps ensure that they look and feel their best.  Good denture care is a commitment, however once you become used to a new routine it will become an easy and natural part of your daily oral care routine:

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Brush your dentures with a non-abrasive paste and a soft nylon denture brush, taking care to remove any remaining residue

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Dissolve a suitable cleanser in a glass of fresh water and soak your dentures for as long as indicated by the manufacturer.  Using a cleanser has the following benefits; provides a deep clean, removes stains, kills bacteria that can cause bad breath and gum irritation

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Rinse your dentures under running cold tap water, then dry carefully. It is also extremely important to maintain a healthy mouth and look after your remaining teeth:

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Full denture wearers gently brush gums with a soft brush and water to keep them in good condition

 

Partial denture wearers clean remaining teeth with a regular toothbrush and toothpaste.

Every Year

Looking after your dentures and maintaining good oral hygiene is important so you can maintain a healthy mouth and your dentures last for many years to come. Make sure you regularly visit your dentist. Since your mouth continues to change, many factors such as bones or gums shrinking and losing weight can affect the fit of your denture.  If you experience any changes in fit, consult your dentist for an adjustment.

Speaking tips

Like anything new in life, dentures take some getting used to.  With time, practice and the following tips, you will be able to speak clearly and confidently.

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Don’t worry if your voice sounds odd to you at first.  When you speak, the sound reaches your ears through vibrations in the bones of the jaw and skull.  Wearing dentures changes and increases the sound, but this is much more noticeable to you than to anyone else.

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If your dentures “click” when you speak, try speaking more slowly to avoid movements that raise and/or move your dentures.

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Bite and swallow before speaking.  This places your dentures in position so you can speak more clearly. To help prevent your dentures from slipping when you speak, we recommend you use a denture adhesive.

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Practice reading aloud while wearing your dentures. Not only will it help you get used to saying common words and sounds , it will give you an idea of how fast or slowly you need to talk in order to minimise challenges with your dentures.

Eating tips

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Start with soft foods. Some good examples are eggs, fish and cooked vegetables.  As you gain more experience and confidence, try eating chewier foods, such as steak or celery.

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Ease back into eating the foods you love with small quantities cut into smaller pieces.

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Consider using a denture adhesive to help your dentures feel more secure and give you a greater bite force.  Denture adhesives can form a seal to stop irritating food particles becoming trapped under the denture.

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dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale

dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale